The Ultimate Guide to a Topographic Survey

July 1, 2020

A topographic survey, also known as a ‘land survey’ or ‘topo survey’ is an accurate representation of a specified area, incorporating the natural and manmade feature, including boundaries, buildings, trees, drain covers, and inspection chambers.

We have put together the ultimate guide to the survey, including what they are beneficial for, how much they cost and why it’s important to have one.

What is a Topographic Survey?

A topographic survey is a survey which maps out a site’s boundaries, manmade and natural features and the levels of a site. The survey is used as the first step in the process for a site’s development, so it’s important that the survey reflects the land in its truest form so that developers and people on the site know exactly what they are working with.

The survey will detail natural and man-made features, including boundaries, neighbouring buildings, trees and ponds.

When Would You Need a Topographic Survey?

As mentioned above, a topographic survey is required to map out a site’s boundaries and features, and the finished report can be used as a legal document to define boundaries of a property or section of land.

The survey would be required for projects in the initial stages to avoid pitfalls and complications later down the line, and is particularly useful for architects, contractors, engineers and designers. The survey will provide exact and precise plans and coordinates to help assist with the planning and layout process.

What Are the Benefits of a Topographical Survey?

A topographical survey, sometimes referred to as a ‘topo survey’ has a number of benefits, including:

  • Serving as an in-depth and accurate picture of the building and/or land
  • Identifying existing conditions and issues with the site
  • Revealing information on a section of land, including the changes that have occurred in the area over a period of time
  • Providing engineers and architects with the necessary data and information of the land to carry out the project successfully
  • Obtaining the correct land and boundary information early on to save considerable time and reduce cost

How Much Does a Topographic Survey Cost?

Topographic surveys can differ in cost, depending on the level of detail you would like relayed into a report. For example, we can carry out a basic survey to include the key features requested, or it can be in-depth to cover an array of details including trees, shrubs, paths, inspection chambers and drainage covers.

At South West Surveys, we offer a free quotation service. The free quotation service we provide enables clients to provide us with all the relevant information we need to carry out an assessment of the site, so that we can provide you with the most competitive survey price.

Contact the Topographic Specialists Today

We work on projects throughout the UK, and have a close proximity to the South Wet so that we can provide topographic surveys in Bristol, Bath, Cheltenham and Gloucester. For more information on our topographic surveys, please contact us today for a free quotation!

FAQ’s

What is a topographic survey?

A topographic survey is an accurate representation of a site, detailing the coordinates and data of a site’s boundaries, manmade and natural features and the level of a site. The survey will then be provided in a drawing format in CAD 2D and/or 3D.

The purpose of a topographic survey is to determine the state of a piece of land or development, detailing the intricate manmade and natural elements to form a report for architects, contractors, engineers and designers to use to avoid any complications in the process of development.

The time it takes to complete the survey will depend on the size of the space that needs to be surveyed, and the level of detail that is required in the report. When you get in touch with the team, we will be able to provide you with a timeframe on the survey, but it’s important that we complete the survey accurately as any mistakes could lead to expensive delays or mistakes in the building process further down the line.